What does donor egg IVF entail?

I’ve been busily blogging these last few weeks about our current donor egg in-vitro fertilization (IVF) attempt, just naively assuming that everyone else already knows what that means. Then last week, two friends (and avid blog readers) asked me who will carry the baby if we get to that stage. Great question! And one I should have addressed earlier. Sometimes I forget that other people don’t also spend their every waking hour reading about, preparing for, or talking about IVF. With three failed ‘normal’ attempts under my belt, as well as our latest foray into donor egg IVF, I’m basically an expert. So please allow me to explain what donor egg IVF is, and how it differs from regular IVF.*

So in a regular IVF cycle, you only need two people: a man and a woman. It begins with the woman taking medication to stimulate follicle growth (‘stims’ if you want to be hip with the IVF lingo). This comes in the form of a liquid that is injected into the thigh or (if you’re super hardcore) the stomach. The woman also takes a medication to suppress ovulation, so that it can be triggered at exactly the right time. This may be a nose spray which makes one feel like one has continuous post-nasal drip, or it may be another injection which needs to be mixed first by breaking a glass vial, because obviously that’s very safe and I’ve definitely never cut myself doing that.**

The woman does these ‘stimming’ injections every day for around two weeks, depending on the specific protocol. After the first ~5 days, she needs to have a blood test and a vaginal ultrasound every couple days. The ultrasound technician will check how the uterine lining is developing, as well as how many follicles are growing in each ovary, if there are any. (Normally only one follicle will develop to maturity in a non-IVF cycle, but the idea of the ‘stims’ is to increase the odds by growing multiple follicles.) The technician will record the number of follicles in each ovary and, if any are larger than 10mm, they will record the size. Or, if you’re like me and don’t grow (m)any follicles, this may turn into a game of ‘find the ovary’.

Once the biggest (‘lead’) follicle reaches a size of around ~20mm, the doctor will have the woman ‘trigger’ ovulation by taking another medication. This is also an injection, again administered in the thigh or stomach (because the woman probably hasn’t had enough needles poked into her recently). This must be taken exactly 36 hours before the egg retrieval surgery, so that the follicles will be nice and mature, but not yet bursting.

The man’s big moment to shine comes the next morning, when he deposits a sperm sample at the hospital. Then, exactly 36 hours after the trigger injection, the woman has the egg retrieval surgery. This is a relatively minor surgery (though it does involve more needles), and I will describe it in more detail in another post.

How does donor egg IVF differ?

In the case of donor egg IVF, you need an additional woman: the egg donor. The main difference is that almost all of the steps I’ve described so far then apply to the woman who is donating eggs, rather than the hopeful mother. The other difference is that the hopeful mother also takes medication (but in this case, to inhibit follicle growth) and has regular ultrasounds to check her uterine lining, since it is she who will (hopefully) carry the baby — not the donor. That means that after the egg retrieval, the donor’s part is done.

All of the subsequent steps (waiting to hear how many eggs are mature, waiting to hear how many eggs fertilize, waiting to hear how many embryos develop, and more waiting to hear if there are any to be placed back in and any extras to be frozen) are the same for both normal and donor egg IVF. If an embryo makes it to transfer, then it is placed in the hopeful mother with what is essentially a high-tech turkey baster. That kicks off the final stage of waiting: waiting to see if the embryo sticks and develops into a baby.

*Note that I’m only referring to actual in-vitro fertilization (IVF) here, not intra-uterine insemination (IUI), a less invasive procedure which is often tried before resorting to IVF.

**I’ve definitely cut myself twice breaking the glass vial. I can’t imagine this is legal in the US…

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